Jack Swigert (CMP)

Well, it was varying lengths. Is it suppose to be a long-time PROCEED?

CapCom

We think it may be, Jack. We think it may be 15 to 20 seconds, and our recommendation is that you PRO and hold it down for a good period of time, probably half a minute or more, and see if the DSKY blanks.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. All right, I didn't hold it in that long. Maybe 2 or 3 seconds is the longest I held it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack just came down the tunnel again and said the computer's okay.

CapCom

Okay. Good to hear it. And did you ever get that BAT C MAIN A reading for us?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I guess in the heat of the battle, I forgot to to give it to you, I guess. Stand by.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

BAT C current was 2 amps and BAT A voltage, 30.2.

CapCom

Copy, 2 amps, 30.2. And that sounds good to us, Jim.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We'd like to have Jack verify that the PYROs in LOGIC are SAFE, and we'd like to remind him to do no further powerup of the CSM until EI minus 2 plus 30.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Roger. He reports that the PYROs are SAFE, and we're standing by for 02:30.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Well, I can't say that this week hasn't been filled with excitement.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Well, James, if you can't take any better care of a spacecraft than that, we might not give you another one. Hey, Jim; Houston. You might ask Jack, while he's down there, to take a peek through the telescope and tell us whether he can see any stars. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Joe, Jack tells me that there's still a lot of particles floating around and he's—he can't pick out any constellation that he recognizes so far. But it might clear here in a little while.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. EECOM is looking at that battery amperage that you gave us awhile ago. He'd like to see it about a half an amp to an amp lower. Like you to ask Jack to just check the circuit breakers and switches that he's pulled in so far and make sure he doesn't have any extra loads on MAIN A; specifically, the FLOODLIGHT configuration, and his CAUTION AND WARNING circuit breakers, and his ESSENTIAL INSTRUMENTATION POWER circuit breakers. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Jack reported that he turned out all the floodlights.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Okay, we copy that. Like to have him check the amperage on there; see what you have now, and give us a voltage reading, too.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Joe. This is Jack.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I've been not reading any voltage at all on BAT C, and the amperage looks like about 2 amps, but that could be kind of noise-level stuff. I've got all the floodlights off and I—Can you think of anything—I could power down to lower MAIN A.

Ken Mattingly

Okay. How about reading the voltage off of MAIN A?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Oh, this is Ken. Okay. Ken, it was 30.2.

Ken Mattingly

Okay. We're checking out the floodlights we gave you. Actually, Jack, you ought to be able to go ahead and use the lights we gave you. There's no reason to sit in the dark. They're supposed to be coming off of MAIN B, and we're checking that now.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. It's not bad down there. We're in—got plenty of light. But should I be reading the voltage on BAT C?

Ken Mattingly

Jack, you should be reading BAT C voltage. That circuit breaker should be open.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Okay, can you think of anything else you want to get turned off to lighten load on MAIN A?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We're perusing that subject right now, Jack. It's really not that big a thing, just something we wanted to dress up.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius; Houston.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Say, Jim, as something to try, you might have Jack turn off the RING 1's AUTO coils, which are probably on MAIN A. Have him turn those off and take a look at the readings.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Jack has turned off RING 1 that was on MAIN A, and he's still reading 30.2 volts.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger that, Jim. What's his amperage? Did he read that off?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I guess. He says it's down in the mud; it's less than 2 amps.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Down in the mud. Okay, understand that. Request he turn them back on and—Okay, Jim, that's the AUTO coils back on RING 1, MAIN A, and when you get that done, I'd like you to copy the entry pad.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Joe. Standing by to copy the entry pad.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, here we come. Entry pad: Mid-Pacific, 000153; 000. The next two lines will be the GET of moonset and the Moon-check attitude; 142:38:17, 178; NOUN 61, minus 21.66, minus 165.37; 06.7; 36211, 6.51; 1168.9, 36292; 142:40:40; 00:28. The next four are N/A; DO is 4.00, 02:04; 00:17, 03:22, 08:14; 33, 353.1, 29.9. Boresight star is Sigma Libra, down 08.8, left 0.4; lift vector up. Comments: GDC for entry alinement, stars 31 and 23. The roll aline 041, pitch 245, yaw 024, use EMS nonexit pattern. Maintain Moon-check attitude until moonset; then go to entry attitude or track horizon with the 36-degree window mark. Last comment: constant g entry is roll right. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Entry pad as follows: Mid-PAC, 000153, 000; 142:38:17, 178; minus 21.66, minus 165.37; 06.7; 36211, 6.51; 1168.9, 36292; 142:40:40; 00:28. Next four columns are N/A; DO is 4.00, 02:04; 00:17, 03:22 08:14; 33, 353.1, 29.9. Zebra Libra, or something like that, Beta Libra is down 08.8, left 0.4; lift vector up; GDC entry alined, stars 31, 33. Roll 041, pitch, 045, yaw 024. EMS nonexit pattern to be used; maintain Moon-check attitude until moonset. and if all else is lost, the constant g entry is right—Roll is right.

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Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Roger that, Jim. I want to verify a couple of things I'm not sure I heard you read back. The first one was Zebra Libra (laughter) that's Sigma Libra. The set stars 31 and 23. Did you get that? Over.

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Spoken on April 17, 1970, 1:56 p.m. UTC (54 years, 2 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. No, I had 31 and 33, and I got Sigma Libra now, and it'll be 31 and 23 for the set stars.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. And your GDC pitch aline, I wasn't sure whether that was—whether you read back 245 or 045. The correct number is 245. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Good show, because I have 045 down. 245.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. And the Moon check here, unlike the horizon check, is on the 36-degree window mark all the way. Just wanted to repeat that.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Moon check on 30-degree window mark.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's 36-degree window mark, Jim.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Readback correct. And, Aquarius; Houston. If you want me to read you the landing area summary, I'll do that.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. In the mid-Pacific landing area, the weather is good. The cloud cover is 2000, scattered; visibility, 10; winds 060 at 10; wave heights are 4 feet, and the altimeter 2986, if you care. Scattered showers less than 10 percent of the area. Recovery forces are as follows: the Iwo Jima will be at the touchdown point, the aircraft call sign will be Recovery 1, on station with swimmers on board. The—we have the constant g backup reentry area covered with the USS Hall, the Good Liberty Ship, and the other recovery aircraft whose call signs you may hear are Samoa Rescue C-130s.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, fine. We have the Iwo Jima as the prime recovery ship.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Joe, Jack tells me he is still having trouble looking through the optics. I'm just going to pitch up a little bit more here to see if he can get into the dark spot.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, real fine. You might tell him when we get to that point, we have some—some stars with corresponding shaft and trunnion angles to pass to him as backups in case the computer doesn't happen to point him straight at one. And it's the Summer Triangle.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And are you tracking us, and do you have any results on that last midcourse?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Stand by. It looks good. I'll try and get you numbers.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

It feels nice to use the hand controller again.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I just said, Joe, it feels nice to use the hand controller again.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Oh. Roger that. FIDO says he's got you nailed within a half a foot per second; the midcourse looked real good.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

And I've got two things we'd like Jack to do in the command module to ease the load on MAIN A. One of them is to verify or turn the CM/RCS HEATER switch to OFF. We're done with that, and even though the circuit breakers are pulled, the switches might be drawing a little current. And the second one is, we'd like him to turn SCS LOGIC POWER 2/3 to OFF; we don't need it now. It's called up in the checklist at the appropriate time, and we'd like him to turn that off. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I'll tell Jack to check that the CM/RCS HEATER switch is off, and, if not, we'll turn it off; and also to turn off the SCS LOGIC POWER 2/3 switch, OFF, since it comes up later in the checklist.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Houston, Aquarius. We're recording MAIN A voltage up to 31.0.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's 31.0. We're smiling.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. How about if I hold a pitch attitude of about 115 instead of about 91. I think Jack can use the optics a little bit better at that angle.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Jim, that's perfectly okay with us, if it looks good for stars.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

He just looked at them briefly; I'll go down and look at them a little bit better here.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. With the new attitude, our shaft and trunnion angles we were going to pass him don't mean anything, but it's more important to have a good star field.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. We—We've been talking about your going to a different attitude than the pad attitude for better star field vision out the command module, and what we'd like to have you do is this. If you can predict now or sometime soon, what attitude it is that you would like to hold at that time, and go to that attitude now, we'd like to be able to compute the coarse aline gimbal angles for the CSM, and we can do that if you go to the selected attitude, hold it, call up a VERB 06 NOUN 20, and read us your LM gimbal angles, we can take those and compute CSM coarse aline gimbal angles on the assumption that, when we get back into the CSM coarse aline, you will return to that selected attitude. Does that sound okay? Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. I'll try to hold the attitude we select directly, while you're giving us the coarse aline attitude. We're not too sure what—what's the best attitude. I'm going to ask Jack again if 115 is sufficient for him.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. You can take some time figuring out the best attitude, and then you won't have to hold it all the way from now until then, if you just get back to it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Houston, Jack would like to know what constellations are in his sextant, or scanning telescope, field of view at an attitude of about 105 pitch, zero roll, zero yaw. Can you give that to us?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We'll sure give it a go. As I said, we—We have some stars. They're not—They're not centered with the shaft and trunnion zero. Let us take a quick look at 105 pitch, shaft and trunnion zero, and see if we can get you an answer.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger. These—None of these stars will be exactly centered, but, at a pitch attitude of 115, we had computed that Vega, Altair, Rasalhague, and Deneb would all be in the telescope field of view, and the first three were also in view at the 91-degree pitch, so he should be able to see one or more of those four stars. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Thank you, very much.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. And, Jim, I can give shaft and trunnions if—if he's interested.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Why don't you give us the shaft and trunnion for—say, Altair at 115, and I'll go up there, and I'll see if he can pick it up.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Real fine, At 115 degrees of pitch, Altair, shaft 274, trunnion 22.2. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Roger. Shaft is 274, trunnion 22.2.