Fred Haise (LMP)

Are you talking about ball theta angles?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Negative. I was—I was reporting the code for NOUN 70.

Flight

They're in the computer, Fred.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Houston. We have the Sun marks and I'll start up at pitch now to go over and pick up the Moon.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Just as a note of interest in this dock configurations for P52s, the command module docking probe is right down the middle of—the docking light, rather, is right down the middle of the detent. And when the Sun flashes on, it really makes it difficult.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Just like the simulator.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. It was good training.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Well, Jack, that's what it says the torquing angles are.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We haven't got them yet.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, hold on to torquing angles, please.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, the reason for the delay is that we're not seeing the data yet. We're having to check a point here; and as soon as they come up, we'll let you know what to do with them.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. We had a large NOUN 105 of—what—112, and our torquing angles, Jack, are minus 01713, minus 03278, minus 01395.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. Minus 01713, and we see them now.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, do you have a star close by there you could check?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I'll look around, Jack. I was just trying to get a check on the Moon, again, to see if those angles were indeed true, and we got the Moon back again and centered.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. What you're reading now the angles? We had the Moon centered, and it's pretty close to what we have on the 8 ball, I guess. Close enough for any entry that we'd like to do.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. And I'm told that Denubla—Denebola and Regulus are nearby if you wanted to make a star check.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I'm going to start pitching around again, and I'll see if I can pick them up. I have Orion out here to my left a little bit, but it's pretty close to the—oh, here. I've got Sirius. That's a nice one. How about that?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, is Jack sitting on the rumble seat there?

Fred Haise (LMP)

He was. He just headed upstairs to take another look around.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. I got a minor addition to the entry checklist for him. This time it's in the —

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Stand by 1. He has that in his pocket.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

What I'm doing, Jack, is just—I'm pitching over now. I'm going to pick up another star. Sirius was just too far off. I thought I was going to use too much gas getting there.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

By the time I get alined in the—in the AOT—be nice if we didn't have Odyssey attached, we could just AUTO—AUTO maneuver over to these things.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Looks to us like you've got her alined, Jim, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. I'm pretty confident that the platform's fairly decent.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. We need an E MOD VERB 74, when you've got a chance, please.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. On your entry checklist, on page 2-5. Down there on step 9, where it says 152 degrees pitch at .05g, adjacent to that, so that Recovery can see you better on the way down, we want you to turn your S-BAND, POWER AMPLIFIER to HIGH. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Turn S-BAND, POWER AMP to HIGH at .05g time.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. We're considering doing the midcourse with PGNS, unless you'd rather do it in AGS.

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Jim Lovell (CDR)

No. PGNS is fine with me. I just aline myself up with the old ball again. So I've got you foresighted again, but any way you want to do it.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Like you say, you might as well go first class.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I guess you're right.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Now wait a minute, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I just lost a lot of friends there.

Fred Haise (LMP)

And, Jack, you can tell Owen Morris that the RCS SYSTEM A/B 2 QUAD 1 breaker is still nicely in.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. We'll pass the word.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. We think we've figured out a way to save you some time at a very critical—very full schedule. And that's by doing a docked coarse aline, since we got the LM up now. That would save you a maneuver or two.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Houston, Aquarius. It seemed to me a docked coarse aline might be quicker for—for Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. We think it would be, and it'd save quite a bit of time at a place where you're going to be pretty busy. Also save you some petrol.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. We're looking at doing this in the service module SEP attitude, and the optics will be pointed away from the Sun. So it should be a good attitude for a P52.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. So, we'll be going to the service module SEP attitude, at which time we'll do a docked coarse aline, and -

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Then you want—You want Jack then to do a P527

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

The way we'll do that in our time line Jim, is to go ahead and do the service module JETT and then we'll just stay in that attitude and when it comes time in our time line as we've outlined, to bring the platform up, we'll proceed with the P52—coarse aline, and then the P52.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Are we going to use the same techniques that we normally do for LM activation? In other words, I try to maintain an attitude, and give him some angles and then—Are you going to give him the angles? Then he does the 52.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Basically, it's the same procedure just reversed, Jim.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Another nice thing about this, is it's one we've done before.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, Aquarius. One thing, however, that we do not plan to do is to proceed with the command module powerup prematurely.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Houston. This is Jack.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I just wanted to talk over with you, it looks like we've had some changes in the flight plan here, due to Jim's P52. Do you have—Can you talk over with me what your plans are?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger, Jack. Since we've got the PGNS up, we plan to use that information to give the CMC a dock coarse aline, and then we're in the service module jettison attitude, we'll wait until it comes time to power up the CMC, and we'll get the CMC a dock coarse aline, and we'll pick some good stars to give you a fine aline with, and it looks like we can pick some stars that are looking away from the Sun in which you can find in that service module jettison attitude; so, we'll save you quite a bit of gas: and save you some time in a very busy time.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Hey, that sounds good. Really fine.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Hey, it's warmed up here now. It's almost comfortable.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I'm looking out the window now, Jack, and that Earth is whistling in like a high-speed freight train.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We're clocking you at 48 000 miles and coming in at about 9000.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I don't think there's many LMs that have seen it like this. I'm still looking for Fra Mauro and Cone Crater.

Deke Slayton

You're going the wrong way, son.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. It looks—just looking over what I may expect here, it looks like I'm just going to get three angles to do a VERB 41 NOUN 20, right?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That's what it looks like from here, Jack. It's pretty much the opposite of the LM activation procedure where we do the dock coarse aline.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, except in a way we did a lot of VERB 06 NOUN 20, ENTERS, simultaneously, and then you all shipped him up post-torque values. You're not going to do anything like that are you?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Say again, please, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. During the activation part, we do a lot of VERB 06 NOUN 20, ENTERS simultaneously, reading you out the difference in the angles, and then MSFN furnishes the post-torquing angles, in order to get the platform fine alined. Do you plan something like that or just three coarse aline angles.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jack, we're going to give you three coarse aline angles, and then you can go right to your checklist as we're giving it, and start in with the VERB 40 NOUN 20.

Fred Haise (LMP)

And, Jack, how do you read?

Fred Haise (LMP)

I was around shooting pictures of all the debris inside here, before we left, and I inadvertently changed the settings on the DC command module Reseau camera that we need for the service module pictures. I wonder if FAO can dig them out again—what we need, f-stop and speed.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Fred, in regards to the camera settings, for black-and-white 3400 film, the settings were f:5.6 at 1/250th. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'd guessed right after all, but thank you.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. I got MCC-7 pad when you're ready to copy. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. We're in luck, I got one pad left.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We'll take care not to change this one. Ready to go?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

MCC-7: 137:39:48.39, minus 0003.1, plus all zeros, plus 00001, N/A, plus 0020.5, 0003.1, 0:23, 008, 359; the rest is N/A. Remarks: plus-X, four jets, RCS; and your weights for the DAP load: LM weight, 25181; CSM weight, 62468. Over.

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Spoken on April 17, 1970, 10:45 a.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, Joe. MCC-7: 137:39:48.39, minus 0003.1, plus all balls, plus 0000.1, N/A, plus 0020.5, plus 0003.1, 0:23, 008 359; the rest of pad N/A. Remarks: plus-X, four jets, RCS, ullage; the LM weight, 25181; CSM weight, 62468. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Readback correct.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

And, Aquarius; Houston. I have a service module SEP pad if you want to copy that, now. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger, Fred. I have a service module SEP pad with the attitudes. You don't need a pad sheet for it; just any old blank sheet will do.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I was going to say I don't—We don't hardly carry a service module SEP pad.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Yes, we'll have to change that.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'm using a P27 here. Go ahead.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. The pad reads as follows and then I'll repeat the angles for you, so you can copy them. The following MCC-7, maneuver the LM to the following FDAI attitudes: roll, 000; pitch, 91.3; yaw, 000. Now do you want those attitudes repeated, Fred?

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Following MCC-7 we're to maneuver to the following attitudes: roll, 000; pitch, 091.3; yaw, 000.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's correct. And the last part of the pad is at GET 138:10:00, which is EI minus 4.5 hours, execute a push of 0.5 feet per second, four jet, plus-X; perform SM SEP; then execute pull, 0.5 feet per second, four jet, minus-X. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Houston, Aquarius. Jack's entering the command module, now.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. That last Joe was execute at the GET at 138:10:00 which is EI minus 4-1/2 hours; execute a push of 0.5 feet per second, four-jet ullage; then execute SM SEP followed by a pull of 0.5 feet per second, with respect to a nomenclature on the TTCA; I think we really need an up of 0.5 and then a down of 0.5.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius. The last pad I had for you right now is the LM jettison pad. Similar to the—Stand by 1, Aquarius.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius; Houston. Request P00 and DATA for a data load. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. And I was about to say the LM jettison pad is similar to the SM SEP pad, Fred, when you're ready to copy.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Just about the same number of lines?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. Prior to 141:40:00, which is EI minus 1 hour, maneuver the LM to the following FDAI angles: roll, 130; pitch, 125; yaw, 012.4. The corresponding CSM gimbal angles will be roll, 291; pitch, 196; yaw, 045, and that's the pad. Over. And the computer is yours, Aquarius.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. A LM SEP pad prior to 141:40:00, EI minus 1 hour, maneuver to following attitudes: roll, 130; pitch, 125; yaw, 012.4. The corresponding CSM gimbal angles are roll, 291; pitch, 196; yaw, 045.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We're so efficient down here that we got an entry pad ready, Fred. Do you want to copy that for Jack? Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Stand by. I'll have to try to borrow his book from him.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Can we hold off on that a little bit, Joe?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Oh, absolutely, Jim. We're well ahead. I just wanted to let you know that we had it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I hope that when you send up all those uplinks to Jack that you could get them up to him quickly.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

We're shooting for less than 5 minutes.

Fred Haise (LMP)

And are you still using the computer?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's a negative, Fred. The computer is yours.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

And, Fred, the computer has your target load in.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I just want to clarify one thing on the LM SEP pad. It appears to me that in my configuration, I could probably use a VERB 49 loading in 622, yaw, pitch, and roll, in that order; and then being able to fly out at 5018 in roll, pitch, and yaw. Is that correct?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Stand by; I'll verify it, Jim.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Joe. And while you're doing that I've got a question about the command module checklist.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. Go ahead with your question.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Either I copied the circuit breaker wrong, or—I can't read it. Comes down just about the—oh, about the 20th one down, after panel 276, where it says CB INSTRUMENTATION POWER CONTROL 3 and 4, open. The next circuit breaker on panel 5—I—Would you give that to me again?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's CB ESSENTIAL INSTRUMENTATION POWER, MAIN B. Over. And it's, closed.