Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's a lot better, and we figure your battery glitch was just that thermal switch triggered a mal—a CAUTION and WARNING, just cycled once, and triggered a MASTER ALARM again. We'll watch the batteries for you, since you don't have any CAUTION and WARNING on now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Appreciate that.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. Your luck is holding. Tracking shows that your entry angle has gone up to minus 6.24. This is on the basis of all the data we've collected between the midcourse up to the time the SHe tank went. So we'll continue to look at it, and see if SHe tank did anything to it at all. So it's—The data has gone from 5.9 to a minus 6.24.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That sounds pretty good. We're really getting in there.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Not bad. Not bad at all.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Is Jack in the sack, or is he with you?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Jack and Fred both are going to sleep. It's sort of humorous; Fred's sleeping place now is in the tunnel, upside down with his head resting on the ascent engine. Jack is on the floor of the LM, with a restraint … wrapped around his arm to keep him down there.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

You say Jack is on the floor, and Fred is with his head on the ascent engine.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's right, with his feet up into the tunnel.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Skipper. Your luck is really hanging in there. Your water's good up to 161 hours now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Hey, that sounds great.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That doesn't include PLSS water or command module water.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Jack, I'd just like to know what—what plans or thoughts being contemplated for the PLSSs or the OPS, whether we're going to use their LiOH canisters or take the devices back in the command module with us, or just what will be your plans.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. We're talking all that over now. We haven't decided.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Everything's running real smooth over in Timber Cove, Jim.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Sounds pretty good. How about at El Lago?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Same. Everything's smooth there, too.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, we've had a lot of people working on the entry procedures, and they'll be continuing to do so. We got a few ideas we'd like to toss at you so you can start thinking about them if you think you're in a position to discuss them without waking up the other guys. What do you think?

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Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, go ahead. It's okay.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. One of the first things we want to do is charge the battery in CSM, so we can get some LM power over there to do that, and we have procedures ginned up to do it. In regards to reentry, we're planning our last midcourse at 5 hours before entry interface, and, if we have to make one, that is. And then we'd like to jettison the service module at 4 hours and a half, roughly, before entry interface, and take the next 3 to 3-1/2 hours for taking pictures, cranking up the command module G&N, taking care of stowage, and other odds and ends. And we'd hang on to the LM until 1 hour before entry interface, and then we'd jettison that. And these procedures are going to be run integrated in the CMS and LMS tomorrow morning, and, hopefully, later on in the day, we'll do it again with Mission Control on the loop. A couple of other things we'd like to toss at you: one question is what do we do with the OPS. The thought is that there is adequate O2 in the command module and that the OPS represents high pressure source and a stowage problem, and people are thinking about leaving them in the LM. The other thing is that we think you might want to make this a suited entry, suiting up prior to LM jettison, because what we're doing is, when we jettison the LM, we're going to do it like we did in Apollo 10—just let the beauty go, and if we weren't suited, why, we'd be betting on the hatch seal to take care of us. So we thought we'd toss these few ideas at you. Some of them are ones that are particularly pertinent questions at this time.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. A suited entry would sort of … the 1-hour LM jettison back and … back and forth up to that time. … impede our progress back and forth. …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I think I've got you back. I guess the midcourse at 5 hours prior to …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Affirmative, Jim. Midcourse 5 hours prior to entry interface.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

If that's the case, all I'm worried about is having that all squared away. It's long before that … I want everything in its place. All the stowage cleared away, all the … ready to go and know exactly what to do and … so that we can do the midcourse, and … get into the command module … jettison the service module, and then know exactly how to get into the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. All those procedures will work—will be worked out precisely, and we agree that the stowage and all of those peripheral details ought to be taken care of before midcourse.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And, I guess, that last midcourse, we'd want to start looking at midcourse fairly early, if we have the power to do so, mainly because of attitude control. This last time was fairly easy, but I'm not too sure how long we can continue to …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I have … in, and it seems about as cold as it is now, we'll probably be going into suits long before entry.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. That's what we were thinking.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I guess the two things which are somewhat unresolved at the moment are what to do with the OPS and what to do about the suited entry. We thought we'd toss those at you to see what you thought about them.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. As far as the OPS is concerned, we have enough oxygen in the spacecraft … to get us through. I have no … command module … suit loop prior to entry. I was looking at … OPS … sources of oxygen … also in the—in the front of the suit loop or … circulate …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I'm sorry. We're not catching what you're saying. The COMM is getting kind of bad right now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. How do you read now?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I've still got you with quite a bit of background noise, but if you talk up like that, I think we can hear you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. My only concern about leaving the OPS and/or the PLSS in the command module is how soon do we have to live off the command module consumables prior to entry, and the PLSS has a fan and has a lithium hydroxide … use the command module system. Also, the OPS … right now … command module … command module oxygen and electrical power is … but I had just as soon be … back in the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

It sounds like the general gist of your comments are that if things remain pretty much as they are now in the command module, you'd just as soon leave the OPS in the LM. Is that affirm?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And maybe you'd like to think over the suited entry bit a little while.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay … How we aline the command module right for entry, especially if you have the LM in back. Over.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's one subject that's been getting a lot of attention, and let me see if I can get some general ideas on that at the moment.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I can give you the general idea of the proposed procedure for bringing the command module G&N up. It's the presently proposed one. We may come up with a better one, but here's what we're looking at right now. First thing we plan to do is to—using the LM COAS, sight on the Earth with the LM just as we did in the midcourse. Then we'll do a body-axis aline, 400 plus 5 on the ACS, to put the AGS ball at 000. And then we can give you an AGS ball attitude to fly to, to point the CSM optics at the Moon. And, if you can see stars, why, we can use those too. Then we can give you an equivalent set of CDU angles to put into NOUN 20 and to torque the platform over. So, now we're coarse alined. Then we do a fine aline by shooting at the Moon and then at the Sun. Do you follow all that?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. Let me see if I have it. What we do is point the LM at the Earth as we did for the midcourse COAS, and we do a body-axis aline on the AGS. Then you give us an AGS ball attitude to fly to. … the LM, and then we … point the … at the Moon. Then you would update the—give us some CDUs to coarse aline. … fine aline … on stars or the Moon or the Earth. Stand by. Okay. We had another MASTER ALARM, Jack. I don't see any lights down there, except the battery light's still there. You want — … display ECS. Okay. And the number 2 battery still has a light on it. I suspect it may be the same problem that we had before … …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Let us talk it over a second, and we'll tell you what to do.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, is the battery light kind of flickering?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. That's affirm, Jack.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. The battery light's flickering, and it triggers off the MASTER ALARM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Well, that—temperature sensor on battery 2 is kind of cycling back and forth and every time it does, it triggers a MASTER ALARM, Jim.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Same old problem, huh?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, Jim, finally on the P52, we're considering using the—the Moon and then the Sun for the fine aline.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. The Moon and the Sun for the fine aline. Understand. We'll go through this again here …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. Once—Once I get the spacecraft at the proper attitude …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I didn't copy your last question due to background noise.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Once—Once you get the AGS ball alined … command module …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

After we do the body axis aline on the AGS, we can tell you what attitude on the AGS ball to fly to in order to point the CSM optics at the Moon or at some star. And then we can, knowing where the optics are pointed, give you an equivalent set of CDU angles to put in NOUN 20 to torque the platform.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That's the current thinking. It may change between now and tomorrow, but right now, that's the way it looks, Jim. It'll probably be some take-off on that anyway.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Are they planning on a G&N entry or using another system, like EMS or something like that?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Nothing like going first class.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. That'll be a switch, won't it?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, are you broken into the food locker in the LM yet?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's affirm, Jack. I sure have. … away.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

You say you did find everything in order in there, huh?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, everything was great.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I had a question about that earlier.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I understand that one of your reasons for a suited entry is the fact that the command module hatch … hasn't been good. It doesn't seem to be any different, but in the other … our hatch is no better than other spacecraft.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

No, the situation, Jim, is that your hatch is as good as any other hatch but that we won't have a chance to verify it until so late in the game, like 1 hour before entry interface, in this case; whereas before, why, we had a chance to evaluate it in lunar orbit. Over.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And that might make your time line a little too crowded, getting your suits on there at the last minute; say, less than an hour before entry interface.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, the next action item we want to pursue is transferring some LM power up to the command module MAIN B so we can start charging battery, and I guess what we ought to do is start on that one when somebody else gets up to help you there. So, when you decide to get the other guys up, or to have someone help, why, let us know and we'll start working on that.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I'll let you have Jack, and Fred's … When in the time line …?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Say again, Jim. I didn't catch that.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

When in our time—What's the GET do you plan on …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I didn't catch all of what you said, but I think you wanted to know when the procedures [on] entry are going to be available and read up to you. If that's the case, why, we're talking about 120 hours or so. As far as the—charging battery A, we want to do that as soon as the other guys get up to help you. We've already passed up some of that procedure, and we have a couple of DELTAs to it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Roger. Jack's already up. He asked … curious when you wanted to do it. Did you understand that? … Is that correct?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, we're having trouble hearing you. The next order of business is to charge battery A, and when you get somebody to help you there, why, we'll go ahead and get done with it.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, before you start working on it let us know, because we've got some DELTAs to the battery charging procedure.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Roger. I'm putting Jack on the line now to copy down the DELTAs …

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, Jack. I'm on the line. …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Go ahead now. I can hear better.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. Joe Kerwin passed me up the procedure for powering the CSM from the LM. Has it changed?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. If you'll get that out, I'll read you the DELTAs.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, The second step was in the LM circuit breakers panel 11 and 16: ASCENT ECA CONTROL, close, two of them. Cross that out. In the next line, we had BATTERY 5 NORMAL FEED, on; cross out BATTERY 5 and put BATTERY 6 in there. In the next line was —

Jack Swigert (CMP)

… Jack … Hey, Jack; I have for step 3, I have BAT 5 and BAT 6 NORMAL FEED, on. You just want BAT 6?

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Spoken on April 16, 1970, 9:36 a.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. Just BAT 6, Jack. And the next line, you had BATTERY 1 and 3. Make that BATTERY 1, 2, 3, and 4. Just add BATs 2 and 4. All four descent BATs. And then the next two lines about waiting 30 minutes, cross that out. And the next line about BATTERIES 2 and 4 OFF/RESET, cross that out, too.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Let me read you all the steps as I've got them, Jack, and make sure we've got them right. … ASCENT ECA, two, closed. Step 2 will now be BAT 6, NORMAL FEED, on. Step 3, BATS 1, 2, 3, and 4, OFF/RESET.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. That part's all right, Jack. And we had—about 11 or 12 steps for the command module. They go as is with no change. And then we had a couple of more procedures for the LM. Stand by 1.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Jack, let me read you command module procedures just to make sure I have them right, also.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Go ahead with the command module procedures.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Connect LM and CSM umbilicals. Step 2, panel 5: LM POWER 1 AC and 2 AC, closed, circuit breakers. Step 3, panel 5: EPS SENSOR SIGNAL, MAIN B, closed. Step 4, panel … closed. Then there's step 5: MAIN B BAT BUS B, closed. Verify MAIN BUS voltage, then switch the LM power to CSM. Step 7: CB MAIN B BAT BUS B, open. And on panel 250, BAT POWER ENTRY and POSTLANDING, open. Verify MAIN BUS voltage.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. The CSM procedure's okay, and then we had to go back to the LM and do something. And the first line is okay, cross out “BAT 5 and 6 OFF,” delete that. And delete the next line also, that says “Panel 11 to 16 ASCENT ECA CONTROL, open.” Then we had a couple of notes which remain the same. Go ahead.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I didn't get the notes, but I'll read you the steps as I have them now. One step, BAT 1, 2, 3, and 4 … and at this point should have BATTERIES 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 ON. Is that affirmative?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. So now we have BAT 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6, ON, and I got two notes. Number 1 is: your circuit breaker protection limits—your circuit breaker protection—limits the current to 15 amps. Number 2 note is: now the umbilical between the LM and the command module is hot. And the MAIN BUS voltage can be monitored by selecting MAIN B.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. These notes are: circuit breaker protection limits current to 15 amps. The tube, the umbilical between the CSM and LM is hot. I can monitor MAIN B for the bus voltage.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. One question here. If we transfer power like this, we're not going to cut us short on power remaining in the CSM …, are we …?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Say it again, Jack. I didn't get it.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Stand by. If we configure the CSM for powering up the LM, we aren't going to cut it short on LM power requirements to get us back in the entry interface, are we?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That's a negative, Jack. According to the latest update, we've got ampere-hours out to 203 hours.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. One question from Jim is, he wants to know whether the procedure has been tried …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Try it again, now, Jack. What did Jim want to know?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. He would like to know whether the procedure has been tried and whether it has been found to be okay; and there's no danger of shorting out any of our batteries or anything we have on board the LM now.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. This procedure has not been tried out as such; however, the hardware paths through which the current flows are the same ones which we used during translunar trajectory, and there's not a problem with shorting out a descent battery. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I'll relay that to Jim.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jack, of course, the reason for all of this is that we see we're 20 amp-hours short on one of the entry batteries, and we've got to juice that up to get you home with.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. What we owe you from here on out is the actual battery A charge procedure, and then a procedure to turn this all around, again.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Do you have it there, and how long is it …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. I have the procedure in front of me. It's about 18 steps, and the reason it's so long is because we're starting from this basic configuration which we gave you earlier. It concerns a charge on battery A, of course, which is our low one. So, when you're ready to copy it, let me know.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Are you ready to read—copy it?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. On panel 250, circuit breaker BAT A, POWER ENTRY/POSTLANDING, close; on panel 275, circuit breaker INVERTER POWER 2, MAIN B, close. Next several circuit breakers are on panel 5; circuit breaker BAT RELAY BUS, BAT A, close; circuit breaker EPS SENSOR UNIT, AC BUS 2, close; CB EPS SENSOR SIGNAL, AC2, close; CB BATTERY CHARGER, MAIN B, close. Are you still with me?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. I'll read back those steps you gave me so far. Panel 250 CB BAT A, POWER ENTRY/POSTLANDING, close, panel 275, CB INVERTER POWER 2, MAIN B, close; panel 5, CB BAT RELAY BUS, BAT A, close; CB EPS SENSOR UNIT, AC BUS 2, close; CB EPS SENSOR SIGNAL, AC2, close, CB BAT CHARGER, MAIN B, close.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Good readback, Jack. The only one is number 1—number 4. I didn't get your readback, but it's EPS SENSOR UNIT AC BUS 2, close. You got that?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes. I read that back CB EPS SENSOR UNIT, close.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. To continue—to continue on—the same panel, panel 5: circuit breaker, BATTERY CHARGER, AC POWER, close; circuit breaker BATTERY CHARGER, BAT A CHARGE, close; circuit breaker INVERTER CONTROL 2, close; circuit breaker INVERTER CONTROL 3, close; I've got a switch for you, MAIN BUS TIE, BAT A/C, OFF; and another switch, BATTERY CHARGE to AC2. Read those back.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. CB BAT CHARGER to AC POWER, close. Stand by. Okay. I had to get a light here. CB BAT CHARGER, BAT A CHARGE, close; CB INVERTER CONTROL 2, close; CB INVERTER CONTROL 3, close; the two switches, MAIN BUS TIE, BAT A/C, OFF; and the second one, BAT CHARGER TO AC2.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

How about reaching over there on your right-hand side and turning the BIOMED off? See if we can improve the COMM a little bit.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. How do you read, now?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. I'm reading you real good now, and I want to verify that the main bus tie that we switched OFF was BAT Alfa Charlie.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

That's verified; MAIN BUS TIE, BAT Alfa Charlie, OFF. And that should …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And in panel 3, I've got a switch for you. AC INVERTER 2 to MAIN B.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. AC INVERTER 2 to MAIN B.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And switch INVERTER 2, AC BUS 2 to on; and another switch, AC BUS 2 RESET, to reset and center; switch BATTERY CHARGE to Alfa; switch DC INDICATOR select BAT CHARGER; and then what we want you to do is to report the charger current and voltage to MSFN every 10 minutes for the first half hour, and then once every 30 minutes after that. And that'll be on our call, Jack. Read back the switches that I just gave you.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. It's panel 3, AC INVERTER 2, MAIN B; INVERTER 2, AC BUS 2, on; AC BUS 2 RESET to reset and center; BAT CHARGER to A, AC INDICATOR select to BAT CHARGER. Report amps and volts to MSFN every 10 minutes for the first 30 minutes, and then every 30 minutes on a MSFN call.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's a good readback, Jack. Now the only thing we owe you is a turnaround from this, which we will have.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Let me ask one question, here. About how long do you think it'll take to charge these batteries?