Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. We got it. The Earth went by at a minus 8 degrees. On a basis of the data —

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

On the basis of the data we have so far, your entry angle is 5.99. The block data we gave you on the pad for a no-COMM midcourse-7 last night is no longer valid because we made this midcourse.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Understand, the no-COMM pad is no longer valid because of the midcourse. Entry angle based on the last 2 hours' tracking is 5.99, and I take it you're going to keep tracking for some time now to see whether we need another midcourse or not.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Are you planning any no-COMM midcourse at 134 and change anyway right now, or are you going to wait?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We're discussing that now, Jim, and it looks like we're going to wait on the tracking. For the time being, since you're in the corridor, why, there's no need to pass it up. But we're going to keep looking at the tracking, and we'll probably come up with one.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

All right. I'm not too sure what the venting is going to do to us so—when this SHe tank ruptures, what it's going to do for us.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. We don't presently expect the SHe tank to have any effect on your trajectory, and the pressure's up to 1921 now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Hey, it's going a lot better than we ever expected. What a way to get a data point.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And, Jack, just think. You thought you were going to sleep through all your watches.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I said, you thought you were going to sleep through all you watches.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Well, you keep waking me up.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. You notice anything?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, Jack. I was just about ready to call you. Underneath quad 4, I noticed a lot of sparklies going out.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Can you hear or feel anything?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

No, I sure can't, but I think it changed our—it changed our PTC. Let me check and see what the drift is.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. She's going down through 600 now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I think we're probably going to have to reestablish PTC. Yes, we got pretty fast yaw drifting, Jack.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Houston, Aquarius. What are your plans?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We're thinking about them right now. Did you say it yawed some?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, I was in a right yaw and now I'm in a left yaw; at a much faster rate than the one we put in PTC.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. We're talking it over. Stand by.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

What's the SHe tank down to now, Jack?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. It's going through 125 pounds now. And we understood you to say —

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

— that it reversed your yaw. Is that affirmative?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Sure did, Jack. It reversed my yaw completely and put in a little pitch, I think.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

But more than anything, it reversed my yaw.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. Have you effectively established PTC in the opposite direction then?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Well, you could say that. I'm not too sure just what kind of pitch or roll I've got, coupled with the yaw. I just saw the Earth go by the LMP's window here, not too long ago at a rather faster rate than we had going the other direction.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Perhaps you can tell how fast I'm having to shift OMNIs.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes, we can tell the COMM cycling back and forth.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Is that what they call a nonpropulsive vent?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Right. I'd hate to see a propulsive one.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

It's going through 50 pounds now. So, are you seeing fewer sparklies?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. Much fewer. Not any at all, now. I'm not sure whether that vent gave me reverse yaw and roll—left roll—that's—if that's what it gave me.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

You say you think it might have given you some left roll as opposed to opposite yaw.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I'm sure it gave me the yaw, Jack, but I'm not too sure …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. We'd kind of like to watch it, see what happens for a little while before we make a recommendation. However, we'll need some inputs from you on that.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Well, we're in no trouble up here as far as—as far as the yaw goes. Everything's fine. It's faster than we had set up before. We just wanted to get into proper thermal constraint, and it's going to take me 15 minutes to get the thrusters up anyway.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Skipper. We don't see any thermal problems as a result of this change. If we see some communications problems, we may have to do something different, but so far, so good. And we'd kind of like to hear from you on LPD numbers, if you get anything going by the window.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. The Earth just went through at an LPD of 26 degrees.

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Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. The Earth went through at 26 degrees going the opposite direction this time—left to right. Is that right?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

From left to right. That's affirmative.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Of course, the only other thing that we'd be concerned about is what change in your velocity this might have had and what DELTA-V it imparted, and we'll have to look at that for a while before we are able to determine it. And, if there is no significant change, why, we prefer just to leave it the way it is.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. We're going to get a time on a revolution here, and maybe that'll help you out.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Right. And, for your information, the tank went at 1937.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's two thousand—1937?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. The Earth went through again at 18 degrees on the LPD.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Earth at 18. Thank you.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. And we didn't see the Moon that time.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. The Moon went through that time at 32 degrees on the LPD.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. Moon at 32. Thanks.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. Well, we didn't get the Earth that time. The Moon came back through at about 10 degrees, and now we're getting to the Earth again. Stand by.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. The Earth came through the LPD at 62 degrees that time. And the total time for the two revolutions,—I missed the Earth revolution before, but the total time for the Earth's two revolutions was 3 minutes and 50 seconds.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Say again the time and the—and also the LPD number. You're in the background noise, Jack.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Okay, Jack. LPD that time was 62 degrees and that was for two revolutions, being at that distance we missed the Earth—The time before we didn't see it. And the time was 3 minutes and 50 seconds.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Three minutes and 50 seconds. Is that rate uncomfortable for you?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Jack, Jim said it isn't uncomfortable. It's a little annoying as for the OMNI switching, and also he said it's kind of—He said this Earth/Moon relationship's kind of … because he doesn't know when to …

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. We've got a MASTER ALARM and we've got a battery light flickering.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Copy a battery light. What battery?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, how about cycling the power temp monitor to find out which battery it is, please.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Yes. That's in work, Joe.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. It's that same old …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. I can hear you now, Say again, please.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. It's the same old—same old one. The only light I'm getting is on BAT 2.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. We copy your same old friend, battery 2. Could you give us high bit rate for a while, please?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. High bit rate, please.

Fred Haise (LMP)

How you getting it now, Jack?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius. You can go low bit rate, POWER AMP, OFF and DOWN VOICE BACKUP now. Voltages and currents look normal on battery 2; so ignore the battery light.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. POWER AMP, OFF, back to low bit rate, and I'll go back to sleep.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

The battery light staying on?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes. We got a steady on BAT 2, BAT FAULT LIGHT and the battery caution light.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And the Skipper in the sack now?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Is the Skipper in the sack now?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Hold on a minute, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. Since the antenna switch is kind of annoying, we've talked them into buying only half of the data. If it gets too troublesome for you to switch antennas, why, just leave it on one antenna and we'll listen to you half of the time.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. It's not really much trouble. That's all we're doing about it. We'll try to keep up with it. And you're satisfied with this attitude so far. I guess you're going to watch the thermal and find out whether perhaps we're going to some other PTC attitude.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. Thermal appears to be no problem. We're looking at what DELTA-V might have been imparted due to this, and it looks like we're not going to change the PTC attitude.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Then DELTA-V was a part of it; I hope it raised that angle a little bit.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. We'll be looking at the data here, and give you a better answer in next 30 minutes or so.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Meanwhile, back to the drawing board about nonpropulsive vents.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, with your kind of luck, it probably lowered the angle some more.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Thanks for the confidence.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, Jim, we're going to have a handover here pretty soon, about 3 minutes, we may lose uplink for 30 seconds or a minute.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. We're handed over. How do you read?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Read you loud and clear, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. I'm hearing you now, and the noise has come up again, but it will go down.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's a lot better, and we figure your battery glitch was just that thermal switch triggered a mal—a CAUTION and WARNING, just cycled once, and triggered a MASTER ALARM again. We'll watch the batteries for you, since you don't have any CAUTION and WARNING on now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Appreciate that.

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Spoken on April 16, 1970, 8:15 a.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jim. Your luck is holding. Tracking shows that your entry angle has gone up to minus 6.24. This is on the basis of all the data we've collected between the midcourse up to the time the SHe tank went. So we'll continue to look at it, and see if SHe tank did anything to it at all. So it's—The data has gone from 5.9 to a minus 6.24.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That sounds pretty good. We're really getting in there.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Not bad. Not bad at all.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Is Jack in the sack, or is he with you?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Jack and Fred both are going to sleep. It's sort of humorous; Fred's sleeping place now is in the tunnel, upside down with his head resting on the ascent engine. Jack is on the floor of the LM, with a restraint … wrapped around his arm to keep him down there.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

You say Jack is on the floor, and Fred is with his head on the ascent engine.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's right, with his feet up into the tunnel.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Skipper. Your luck is really hanging in there. Your water's good up to 161 hours now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Hey, that sounds great.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

That doesn't include PLSS water or command module water.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Jack, I'd just like to know what—what plans or thoughts being contemplated for the PLSSs or the OPS, whether we're going to use their LiOH canisters or take the devices back in the command module with us, or just what will be your plans.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. We're talking all that over now. We haven't decided.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Everything's running real smooth over in Timber Cove, Jim.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Sounds pretty good. How about at El Lago?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Same. Everything's smooth there, too.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, we've had a lot of people working on the entry procedures, and they'll be continuing to do so. We got a few ideas we'd like to toss at you so you can start thinking about them if you think you're in a position to discuss them without waking up the other guys. What do you think?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes, go ahead. It's okay.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. One of the first things we want to do is charge the battery in CSM, so we can get some LM power over there to do that, and we have procedures ginned up to do it. In regards to reentry, we're planning our last midcourse at 5 hours before entry interface, and, if we have to make one, that is. And then we'd like to jettison the service module at 4 hours and a half, roughly, before entry interface, and take the next 3 to 3-1/2 hours for taking pictures, cranking up the command module G&N, taking care of stowage, and other odds and ends. And we'd hang on to the LM until 1 hour before entry interface, and then we'd jettison that. And these procedures are going to be run integrated in the CMS and LMS tomorrow morning, and, hopefully, later on in the day, we'll do it again with Mission Control on the loop. A couple of other things we'd like to toss at you: one question is what do we do with the OPS. The thought is that there is adequate O2 in the command module and that the OPS represents high pressure source and a stowage problem, and people are thinking about leaving them in the LM. The other thing is that we think you might want to make this a suited entry, suiting up prior to LM jettison, because what we're doing is, when we jettison the LM, we're going to do it like we did in Apollo 10—just let the beauty go, and if we weren't suited, why, we'd be betting on the hatch seal to take care of us. So we thought we'd toss these few ideas at you. Some of them are ones that are particularly pertinent questions at this time.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. A suited entry would sort of … the 1-hour LM jettison back and … back and forth up to that time. … impede our progress back and forth. …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I think I've got you back. I guess the midcourse at 5 hours prior to …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Affirmative, Jim. Midcourse 5 hours prior to entry interface.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

If that's the case, all I'm worried about is having that all squared away. It's long before that … I want everything in its place. All the stowage cleared away, all the … ready to go and know exactly what to do and … so that we can do the midcourse, and … get into the command module … jettison the service module, and then know exactly how to get into the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. All those procedures will work—will be worked out precisely, and we agree that the stowage and all of those peripheral details ought to be taken care of before midcourse.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And, I guess, that last midcourse, we'd want to start looking at midcourse fairly early, if we have the power to do so, mainly because of attitude control. This last time was fairly easy, but I'm not too sure how long we can continue to …

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I have … in, and it seems about as cold as it is now, we'll probably be going into suits long before entry.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes. That's what we were thinking.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I guess the two things which are somewhat unresolved at the moment are what to do with the OPS and what to do about the suited entry. We thought we'd toss those at you to see what you thought about them.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. As far as the OPS is concerned, we have enough oxygen in the spacecraft … to get us through. I have no … command module … suit loop prior to entry. I was looking at … OPS … sources of oxygen … also in the—in the front of the suit loop or … circulate …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I'm sorry. We're not catching what you're saying. The COMM is getting kind of bad right now.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. How do you read now?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I've still got you with quite a bit of background noise, but if you talk up like that, I think we can hear you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. My only concern about leaving the OPS and/or the PLSS in the command module is how soon do we have to live off the command module consumables prior to entry, and the PLSS has a fan and has a lithium hydroxide … use the command module system. Also, the OPS … right now … command module … command module oxygen and electrical power is … but I had just as soon be … back in the LM.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

It sounds like the general gist of your comments are that if things remain pretty much as they are now in the command module, you'd just as soon leave the OPS in the LM. Is that affirm?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And maybe you'd like to think over the suited entry bit a little while.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay … How we aline the command module right for entry, especially if you have the LM in back. Over.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. That's one subject that's been getting a lot of attention, and let me see if I can get some general ideas on that at the moment.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Jim, I can give you the general idea of the proposed procedure for bringing the command module G&N up. It's the presently proposed one. We may come up with a better one, but here's what we're looking at right now. First thing we plan to do is to—using the LM COAS, sight on the Earth with the LM just as we did in the midcourse. Then we'll do a body-axis aline, 400 plus 5 on the ACS, to put the AGS ball at 000. And then we can give you an AGS ball attitude to fly to, to point the CSM optics at the Moon. And, if you can see stars, why, we can use those too. Then we can give you an equivalent set of CDU angles to put into NOUN 20 and to torque the platform over. So, now we're coarse alined. Then we do a fine aline by shooting at the Moon and then at the Sun. Do you follow all that?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Jack. Let me see if I have it. What we do is point the LM at the Earth as we did for the midcourse COAS, and we do a body-axis aline on the AGS. Then you give us an AGS ball attitude to fly to. … the LM, and then we … point the … at the Moon. Then you would update the—give us some CDUs to coarse aline. … fine aline … on stars or the Moon or the Earth. Stand by. Okay. We had another MASTER ALARM, Jack. I don't see any lights down there, except the battery light's still there. You want — … display ECS. Okay. And the number 2 battery still has a light on it. I suspect it may be the same problem that we had before … …