Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'll stay this mode, if it's all right, so we won't be hot miked.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. You're cleared to open the POWER AMPLIFIER circuit breaker and go to LOW BIT RATE, leaving the POWER AMP switch in PRIMARY.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'll pull the prime S-BAND POWER AMP breaker and go LOW BIT RATE.

Fred Haise (LMP)

About how far out are we now, Jack?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius. You're 150 000 miles and you're coming in at 4500 feet a second. That's from the Earth.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. We're at 100—Yes. 150 K, 4500 feet a second.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, Aquarius, how much TTCA control did you have to do in the burn?

Fred Haise (LMP)

How much—What was that, Jack?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

How much control of the TTCA did you have to do during the burn?

Fred Haise (LMP)

I wasn't noticing Jim too much. I'd say I put in maybe about six or seven inputs. I don't think it ever got off more than a couple of needle widths.

Fred Haise (LMP)

I think it's probably the same for Jim. I wasn't noticing his input but the—his needle was hanging in there pretty good.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. How do you read?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

I read you loud and clear, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. What's your status, who's sleeping, and who's working?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Well, right now we're all three kind of working. Do you have any recommendations?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Yes, looks like to us from here that you and Fred ought to get some sleep, and that you ought to eat in about 6 hours. And that the Skipper ought to go to bed about 113 hours.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

I've got some other information. We shouldn't have some good dope on your trajectory for about 2 hours. Looked like to us that the burn was real good, however, and we're taking a close look at it, and we'll get back with you on that in about 2 hours from now. Another thing that we're expecting to have happen is that the SHe tank is going to reach its burst limit. The earliest time we predict this will happen will be at 107 hours on about 25 minutes. And the latest probable time is at 110 hours, and this is supposed to be a nonpropulsive vent, but you might hear it and you might see something.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. That's good news. We were wondering about that. And I'll relay all the other information you gave me.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And if the SHe tank does burst during this time frame before we get trajectory info, why, that will delay our trajectory info somewhat. Your consumables, your water is now good through 152 hours.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Jack, wait a minute. Let me copy some of this down.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. We're predicting that you still have more water than you need. And one thing we'd like for you to do is when you're going to sleep up there in the command module take a look through the optics and see if you can see any stars.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack, I will do. Jim and I were able to spot constellations from the windows of the LM when there's no venting taking place. Could you give me some time on these consumables, what you're predicting they're good for? I think you started to give them times, didn't you, or was I just hearing things.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We started to give you some times. We think we might be able to give you some better ones pretty soon. But it looks like your water is good through 154 hours, and you've got takusan O2 through 272 hours, plenty of lithium hydroxide, and your amp-hours ought to be good through 199 or 200 hours. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay; good. Copy that.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

We expect that your water rate is going to drop off and at the time, DELTA will go up to 160—165 hours quite shortly. Another thing we're interested in is what's your status on rest and medication.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. None of us, I know of, had any medications, and right now as far as rest, I suppose we're no tireder than normally in this situation. I'm going to relay the work-sleep cycle.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. And don't forget to look through the optics when you go up in the command module.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

(Laughter) Okay. I'll do that.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Jack, as luck would have it, we just now started to vent a little from the command module …

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Sorry about that but there's too much background noise to read you. I think we'll have to wait until you come up on a new antenna. Over.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Aquarius. Go ahead now. I think I can hear you.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Okay, Jack. I was going to say, as luck would have it, the command module picked this time to start venting again, so I probably won't be able to get a good hack out of stars out of the telescope.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Thank you. And if you can think of it, when the time comes up, when you're not venting how about remembering to take a look through them and give us a word?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Did you call?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, Jack. I just got a question. How long are you predicting our command module canisters to last in here?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. We've got 14 cartridges that'll last 157 hours, plus we've got the LM primary cartridge with 23 hours, and we've got two PLSS cartridges with 7 hours apiece.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I was just curious as to how much time we've got out of these two cartridges.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Stand by 1. I'll get a prediction on that. By the way, I hope you're keeping track of the ones you've used and the ones you've not.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, right now, we have numbers 7 and 8 in the LM here.

Expand selection up Contract selection down Close
Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on April 16, 1970, 5:58 a.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jack Swigert (CMP)

They were two brand new fresh ones.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. In regards to the CO2 canisters, by the way the PCO2 is reading 1.6 down here now. We expect that we can get 6 more hours out of the two canisters that we have there—6 hours at least. However, at 112 hours, when we've got several people up, we're going to rig up two more and we have the new simplified procedure for doing this. However, in the meantime, should we need to have a canister change, we plan to switch to the LM primary canister. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Copy that, Jack.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

And, Aquarius, how's your PTC holding up?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Well, we got a little bit off Jack. The—It starts high in the LMP's window and goes low in the CDR window.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

So we've got a little bit of a wobble on it. Of course, the command module venting doesn't help, either.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Jack, in reference to your question about the PTC, on this last complete revolution, the Sun first appeared in the very top right corner of the LMP window, passed over the CDR window, and was visible through the overhead window, and now the Moon is—came pretty well through the center of both windows this last time.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Thank you, Jack. Copying that.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. We'd like to get a little better idea of how PTC is going. So, what we'd like for you to do is what we did last time. That is to give us a reading on the center of the Earth and the center of the Moon on the—LPD.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

On the LPD. Okay, It's shifted. Let's see, the Moon's gone by and the Earth didn't come into the LPD last time.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. But when it goes by the plane of the LPD, tell us where it was. Okay?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. This pass, the Earth came into view at the top left-hand corner of the LMP's window and was going down. However, when it passed it wasn't as high up as the last pass. It did pass into view at the CDR window, but too high up to get an LPD reading.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Roger. Understand it went high in both windows then.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, last time it wasn't even visible in the CDR's window; this time it was visible if you squatted down, but too high up to get an LPD reading.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. That's good. Thank you.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Houston; Aquarius.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. The moon came into view at the middle of the LMP's window, passed through the CDR's window at an LPD of 5 degrees.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Jack. On this pass, the Earth came into the view at the top part of the LMP's window, and we got an LPD angle on it as it passed through the CDR's window of a minus 4 degrees.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. A minus 4. Thank you, Jack —

Jack Swigert (CMP)

It's—it's above the—Okay. Are you familiar with the minus 4 being halfway through the sky part, huh?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Houston; Aquarius.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. On this pass, the Moon came into view at the top part of the LMP's window, came across higher. Jim estimates the LPD angle at a minus 15 degrees.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. A minus 15 on the moon, and sounds like it's set up pretty well.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Everybody's happy with it down there?

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, it's a little too early to tell exactly how the PTC is going. We'd like to get a few more points, so keep reading them off, and we're still looking for that SUPERCRIT to go anytime.

Unidentified crew member

Okay.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

The Earth was just fairly high in the LMP's window and across the 14-degree LPD line.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay, Skipper; 14 degrees. Thank you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

The Moon went by the LPD at 6 degrees, plus 6 degrees.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. Earth at plus 6. Thank you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's the Moon, the Moon.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. The Moon. Thank you.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

The Moon passed by at a minus 8 degrees on the LPD. No, that's the Earth. The Earth passed by at a minus 8 degrees.

Jack Lousma (CAPCOM)

Okay. The Moon went by at a minus 8 degrees.