Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance. The readings that you wanted; are you ready?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

BAT Charlie, 37.0; pyro A, 37.0; pyro B, 37.0; SPS helium pressure, 3450; and just for kicks, nitrogen A, 2300; nitrogen B, 2400; CM RCS injector temperatures: 5 Charlie, 4.5; 5 Dog, 3.5; 6 Alfa, 4.0; 6 Baker, 4.6; 6 Charlie, 4.0; 6 Dog, 3.8; battery manifold pressure, 4 Alfa, 1.4.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack, We got it. Thank you very much.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. How does the telemetry look on our—on the old Odyssey?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

It doesn't look too cold. Looks pretty good.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Thank you very much.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

We're going to need him.

Deke Slayton

How does it feel, Jack?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

I'll tell you, Deke, it's cold up in there. I don't know whether we'll be able to sleep up there tonight; it must be about 35 or 40 degrees.

Deke Slayton

Roger. That's just what I was worrying about.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Right now, we're getting two sets of CWGs on.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

It's not uncomfortable at all in Aquarius, but it definitely is cold in Odyssey.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Vance. Jim's back on.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

We just had a change in watch; that's all.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston, Over.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, two items: in the command module, we wish to verify that the PYRO BATTERY selector was left in the main position. And we're ready to have the POWER AMP circuit breaker on panel 16 pulled, whenever you are ready.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Vance. Fred just tells me that he put it there, and we're checking that again about the PYRO BATTERY selector in the main position.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. Understand that you are checking it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And I will pull the POWER AMP circuit breaker.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

How does number 2 battery look to you now?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, it looks like it was probably a sensor problem; the battery number 2 is load-sharing well. And we see no indications of higher temperatures in the glycol loop or anything that would make us think that it is heating up.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I just want to talk over a little philosophy here. Fred told me that at one time you came up and told him that we were a little steep on the entry angle, and now our burn is going to make us—give us a steeper angle. I just want to make sure that we're all talking about the same thing, that, in essence, at this particular situation, we're shallow, are not steep, and we are going to increase the angle.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, the situation is that, at the moment, we're a little bit shallow, and retrograde midcourse is going to put us more in the center of the corridor. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay; fine. I just wanted to make sure. Fred had written down some time ago, that—that our angle now was about 71 and we were going to do a midcourse of 7 feet per second because its appears that we're going to shallow it out. I think we're all talking the same language now.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. And, I guess it follows, but your perigee is a little bit high right now, too; so that will be bringing it back—back down, that is.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. Yes, that's the important thing.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

One other question, Jim. Our readings down here say your LM cabin's about as cold as the command module cabin. Is that right?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Well, we really don't know. There's usually two people in the LM cabin, and it's a lot—It seems to be a lot more compact, and so we don't notice the coldness down here as we do in the command module.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Some time ago, I copied down a long COMM midcourse-7 corridor control burn at a GET of 134:59:42.98. Is that burn pad still valid?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, that's affirm. That pad is still valid.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And that is assuming no midcourse 7 here at 105 hours.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, we're setting up your burn for 105:30, and we'll be working up a pad, et cetera, based on that time. Over.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

And, additional point; I guess this one's for Jack. Do we have any idea why we couldn't read the MAIN BUS B voltage a while back when first he didn't get it and then later he did?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. I think we have a reason for that. Stand by.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

It appears, Vance, that the battery charge circuit breaker which appeared to be in, wasn't in. Fred pulled it and reset it, and then he started getting readings.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. Which circuit breaker was that?

Jim Lovell (CDR)

It was—It was the battery charge circuit breaker that allows you to read volts, but we haven't—don't know the exact name for it yet.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

The name is BATTERY CHARGER BAT B CHARGE Jack tells me.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. BATTERY CHARGER BAT B CHARGE.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Have you opened your—just curiosity—Have you opened your food locker just aft of the LM data file? Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Yes. It's been opened.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. Just checking. Thanks.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

. .. meal had come through.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

It came at the right time.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, we have some CSM temperatures here for you that might be of interest, if you're ready to copy.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. Your quad package temperatures range from 85 degrees to 44 degrees. Your CM RCS injectors range from 44 degrees to 21; and your heat shield is well above its lower limits in all the various locations. Temperatures appear to be cycling based on Sun angle, and it's no sweat. They all look very good.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Sounds good.

Expand selection down Contract selection up

Spoken on April 16, 1970, 2:04 a.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Were you calling, Houston?

Fred Haise (LMP)

And, Houston, how do you read Aquarius?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Read you loud and clear, Fred. How do you read?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. We were just about to send you up some items of information pertaining to the burn. Are you ready to copy?

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Go ahead, Vance.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. First of all, preparations for this, starting with contingency checklist, page 24, we would recommend should start at 104:30 GET, and we'll be happy to receive any comments you have on that, though. Second point: when you're in the burn attitude, you should see the Sun at the very top of the AOT. It'll be splitting the cursor, when your cursor's set at zero. One thing to be aware of though, that it'll slip right out of the AOT very easily since it'll be very sensitive to roll and yaw. Understand that's in detent 2, by the way. Next point: the burn is very insensitive to burn time and attitude. In other words, if necessary, we can slip it if there's any problem at all, and attitude isn't too critical. So that brings us to the point that we only have one real burn rule; that is, if—rate about any axis gets to 10 degrees a second, that's the limit to stop the burn. Next point, after you finish the burn, and before you trim, request that you leave DEDA in address 470 up a while so we can take a look at it, and let us holler when we've seen it, and then proceed on. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, Vance. You're saying we should start into the PREP in the contingency book at about 104:30, and I'll talk this over in a minute with Jim and we'll get back with you on it. When in the burn attitude, we should see the Sun right at the top of the AOT, and I assume this is detent number 2. Jim and I'd already been talking about that, and just eyeballing the terminator in the Earth, we figured the Sun at about something like a 70-degree angle—65-degree angle, so that'll be right up there. We get one burn rule that says if the rates are greater than 10 degrees per second, shut her down. And, after we trim, you want me to leave 470 up for a while so you all can have a look at it, and you'll tell me when to get rid of it.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

That's right, Fred. And, if you have any questions at all regarding the alinement, why please let us know. We'll be happy to answer them, like alining on the Earth, as was described before. Also, you should know that the pitch is the most critical attitude so far as errors are concerned in this burn; but, as I said, it's still not very sensitive.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Yes, the—and unfortunately, the way we're looking out the window through the COAS, we can aline the yaw and roll pretty well, but it's the—Sun that has to get us pitch.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Right. And—and a correction on this DEDA 470 thing. Request that we let you—Give you a GO before you trim. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Say—Say again, Vance, on that last.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. We would like to see address 470, and give you a GO before you trim. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Oh, okay. I—I see. Okay. After burn, we'll leave 470 up a while and wait for your word to do the trim.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

That's correct. How was the sleep?