Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. We still don't have a final answer on whether or not it'll leak. If you need it, I'd go ahead and use it; and standing by for your completion of the hose-insertion procedure.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. The hose-insertion procedure … the second cartridge is complete.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's complete. The next step is to switch to the primary CO2 canister and remove the secondary canister and stow it. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'm going to have to get off COMM here; I'll let Jack get the headset.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Hey, Joe. I'm on the headset now.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Is that secondary? … secondary?

Fred Haise (LMP)

Both cartridges are out.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Joe. Fred has the secondary cartridge out. We're back on primary now.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. The next step is to place the command module canisters with the hoses attached in a suitable location to permit the bottom of the canister to be exposed to free airflow and tape them in place. Ideally, well, it doesn't matter. Just—just pick out your own spot.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I'm going to tell you where they are. They're both situated, as you say, with the bottom of the canister exposed to free air, and one is sitting right by the—the LMP's is sitting right by the EPS panel, and the CDR's is up in the tunnel.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Jack, Houston. The COMM got real noisy there, and I didn't copy that. Stand by a moment.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's real good, Jack; go ahead.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. The canisters are situated as you—as you would like with the bottom of the canister exposed to free air.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

The position of the LMP's canister—The LMP's canister is sitting on the EPS panel now, and the CDR's canister is positioned up in the tunnel.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Real fine, Jack. The next step is to physically separate both blue hoses a good distance away from the canister so that we don't short circuit the flow, and tape them in place; and the ideal location for them would be up in the tunnel so as to get some flow into the command module. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Both hoses in the—up into the command module?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Oh, you can use your judgment on that, Jack. We'd like at least one, and the recommendation that I got was to put them both up in the tunnel.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. We have the LMP's blue hose up by the LMP's window and the—Of course, the red hose is separated by some 4 feet. And the—Okay. We're going to—and the other hose—the—has the extension on it—The CDR's blue hose, of course, has the extension on it, and it's blowing way up in the command module. And the red hose is about—Oh, it's right at the docking ring where the blue latches are, so there's about 4 or 5 feet difference from there, too. Is this satisfactory?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. That sounds satisfactory. The next steps are—are suit-loop configuration steps, and the first one is to —

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

— is to place the SUIT DIVERTER valve to the PULL EGRESS position.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. SUIT DIVERTER valve to PULL EGRESS.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. The next step is CABIN GAS RETURN to EGRESS. Over.

Unidentified crew member

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. Did you copy CABIN GAS RETURN to EGRESS? Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

No, I didn't get that, Joe. CABIN GAS RETURN to EGRESS.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Next, SUIT CIRCUIT RELIEF to CLOSE. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

SUIT CIRCUIT RELIEF to CLOSE.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I got that done.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. And the last step is select secondary CO2 canister. We'll let it flow through the empty hole, and let's see how we do.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Select secondary CO2 canister.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Roger, Jack. That completes that procedure, and the next thing I've got for you is a procedure for going back into the command module and powering up the main buses temporarily using the BUS TIE switches. We want to do this for two reasons: first of all, we want it absolutely verified that there are no loads on the main buses, that we've got everything off and that the buses look good; and the second thing we want to do is to power the bus—the main buses, with the BUS TIE motor switches, and then depower them by pulling the circuit breakers, leaving the MAIN BUS TIE switches in the on position, just to assure that they'll be there when we need them, whether the batteries get cold or not. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Joe. How you read?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Better now, Jack. Satisfactory. Did you copy my rationale for the main bus powerup?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes, I did. You want to remove—You want to power up both buses, with the BUS TIE motor switches; first of all, to see that there are no loads on the buses, and second, and then depower the buses by pulling the circuit breakers to insure that the motor switches don't—that the BUS TIES stay on so that they're there when we need them.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's correct, Jack. Are you ready to copy the procedure?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. As the first step, I have one change to the basic configuration that we gave you, and it's two more circuit breakers that we want open. On panel 225—Are you ready to write that down? Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Yes. I'm all ready, Joe. Go ahead.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Joe, I'm all ready. Go ahead.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. On panel 225, we want the RENDEZVOUS TRANSPONDER FLIGHT BUS circuit breaker open, and the S-BAND FM TRANSMITTER/DSE FLIGHT BUS circuit breaker open. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. TV RENDEZVOUS TRANSPONDER FLIGHT BUS, open; TV S-BAND TRANSMITTER/DSE FLIGHT BUS open on panel 225.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's correct, Jack. And now we'll go into the main bus powerup procedure. And the first step there, is on panel 5. We want the BAT CHARGER BAT A CHARGE circuit breaker closed, and the BAT CHARGER BAT B CHARGE circuit breaker closed. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. That's BAT CHARGER BAT A CHARGE, BAT CHARGER BAT B CHARGE, both closed on panel 5.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. We need them closed to power the switches. Next on panel 5, we want the EPS SENSOR SIGNAL MAIN A and MAIN B circuit breakers closed. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Panel 5, CB EPS sensor's signals MAIN A and MAIN B closed.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's affirmative. We need them closed so that you can read out your volts and amps. Next step, on panel 250, we want circuit breaker BAT A POWER ENTRY and POSTLANDING and BAT B POWER ENTRY and POSTLANDING, closed. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay on panel 250, CB BAT A POWER, ENTRY and POSTLANDING, closed; BAT B POWER ENTRY and POSTLANDING, closed.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. And at that point, we'd like you to check the BAT bus voltages on both BAT buses to make sure we don't have any shorts. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Read the BAT bus voltages on BAT BUS A and BAT BUS B.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. The next step on panel 275: circuit breaker MAIN A, BAT BUS A, closed, and circuit breaker MAIN B, BAT BUS B, closed. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. On 275, circuit breakers MAIN A, BAT BUS A, closed; MAIN B, BAT BUS B, closed.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's affirmative. The next step on panel 5: we want the MAIN BUS TIE A/C switch to the BAT A/C position, and verify proper voltage on MAIN BUS A, and read the amps on BAT A to make sure we don't have a short. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack; Houston. We're in bad COMM again; let's wait a minute.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. How do you read …?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's better, Jack. Go ahead with your readback.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Place MAIN BUS TIE A/C, on, read MAIN BUS A current and voltage.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's affirmative. The next step will be the MAIN BUS TIE B/C switch to the on position and read MAIN B voltage and battery B amperage as above. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, MAIN BUS TIE B/C on; read MAIN B voltage and current.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That is correct. Then to reconfigure from this configuration, Jack, we want you to leave the MAIN BUS TIE switches in the on position and pull the circuit breakers out in reverse order that we had you close them. Over; and do you want me to read them up individually?

Jack Swigert (CMP)

No, let me see if I've got it here. I go down to panel 275, open CB MAIN A, BAT BUS A and CB MAIN B, BAT BUS B. Then I go down to 250, and pull CB BAT A POWER ENTRY/POSTLANDING and BAT B POWER ENTRY/POSTLANDING and then up on panel 5, pull EPS SENSOR SIGNAL MAIN A, SENSOR SIGNAL MAIN B, BATTERY CHARGER BAT B CHARGE, BATTERY CHARGER BAT A CHARGE. And then close—I don't know whether you want me to close the RENDEZVOUS RADAR TRANSPONDER FLIGHT BUS and S-BAND TRANSMITTER/DSE FLIGHT BUS.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. We don't want you to close those last two. Those are changes to your basic configuration, and we want to leave them open for now. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. I'll do that. Was the rest of the readback okay?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's correct. Readback was 100 percent, and we'll wait to hear from you.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Joe. And just for confirmation, I went through the switch list you gave me. We are in exactly that configuration with one exception, and that is over on panel 382. I have not, the a—H2O ACCUMULATOR is in the OFF position so that if we need any more water, we can get it.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Roger, Jack. Copy that. On panel 382, you've left the H2O ACCUMULATOR valves in the OFF position, and we concur.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. And there's one other thing that I don't know whether you're aware of. We have no lithium hydroxide canisters in panel two fif- in—canisters now. So when we get ready to power up, you'll have to remind us when you want us to add some.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. We copy that. That's correct, and I'll add that to our basic checklist so that we won't forget it.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. Real fine, Joe, and I'm on my way back into the command module.

Fred Haise (LMP)

How do you read, Joe?

Fred Haise (LMP)

And, Joe, how do you read Aquarius?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Pretty good. Go ahead.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'm back on the line now, but Jack really … headed back to the upstairs bedroom.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Roger that, Fred.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. We recommend that you push your MASTER ALARM circuit breaker in so you'll have audio and visual on that, and, also, we medical types are getting to feel left out down here, and we'd like you to give us BIOMED … position, if you're plugged in for it, and we'll see whether it affects the voice or not. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Hey, Houston; Aquarius. On DOWN VOICE BACKUP S-band, how do you read me?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Read you now satisfactory.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. And that's my …

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Thank you very much, Fred.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Actually, a good deal of that little power pack heats up and …

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Go ahead.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, Jack just … himself back down. And after he put on the 250 BAT A, BAT B breakers, he read BAT bus volts as 32.3 on A, 37.0 on B; he then punched in the 275 breakers, which tied the batteries to the buses, and at that time he read the A bus volts 32.0 on A, zero amps; 37.0 on B, zero amps.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. The COMM got noisy there, and I want to make sure we get these numbers right, so I'd like to ask you to repeat them …

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. How do you read now, Joe?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay; probably okay, Fred. Read it nice and slow so we'll be sure to get it. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Jack pushed in the 250 BAT A, BAT B entry breakers. He read battery bus volts as 32.3 on A, 37.0 on B. Then he pushed in the 275 breakers tying the BATs to the main buses. In this configuration, MAIN A is at 32.0 volts, zero amps; MAIN B is at 37.0 volts, zero amps. So it looks like the buses are okay.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. Copy those numbers and thank you very much. I assume you got them off all right.

Fred Haise (LMP)

That's affirm. We got all the breakers pulled again.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Hey, Houston; Aquarius. How do you read?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Go ahead.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. How did our … configurations appear to be working down there?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

I'm sorry, Fred, but we got noisy again there.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Let me know when you want me to try it.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. That sounds better already. Go ahead.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. I'd just like to … how's—how's our lith-o cartridge setup … appear to be working down there.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

We are reading 0.2 on our CO2 sets here, and we're all delighted. It seems to be working fine.

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Spoken on April 15, 1970, 5:09 p.m. UTC (51 years, 7 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

And Fred, Houston. In a little while here, I'm going to have a procedure that I want to read up to you and have you copy down for future use. It's a procedure for powering the command module main bus off the LM, and it's something that we feel that's going to come in real handy later on for such things as popping off the command module entry batteries, and also possibly for doing some preheating and preliminary powering up of the command module before we get rid of the LM. We'll have that for you in probably 10 or 15 minutes. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, okay, Joe. That's good. Sounds good.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. Our procedure-generating mill has generated another very short one for you here. It's a procedure for getting an onboard read-out —

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. This is a procedure for getting a read-out of the descent propellant tank temps. It's no big problem, but our LM people say that the bottom of the descent stage is probably cooling off, and we just want to verify that the descent water tank will be okay. Right now, it looks as though it won't freeze until several hours after it's empty, but we want to have you read these temperatures out to us so we can see how good our predictions are. The procedure is, on panel 16, close the PROPELLANT DISPLAY/ENGINE OVERRIDE LOGIC circuit breaker. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. The PROPELLANT DISPLAY OVERRIDE circuit breakers are closed. … the propellant.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Right, Fred. The next step is simply to turn the PROPELLANT TEMP PRESS MONITOR switch to DESCENT 1, read the fuel and OX temps, turn it to DESCENT 2, read the fuel and OX temps; tell us what they are.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. On DESCENT 1, I get a fuel temp of 66.5 degrees, OX … on DESCENT 2, I get …

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay, Fred. We're in noisy COMM here; I got DESCENT 1 fuel 66.5; stand by a second.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. How do you read, now …?

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

That's better. Go ahead.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. You got 66.5 on DESCENT 1 fuel temp, oxidizer temp is 66 degrees.

Fred Haise (LMP)

On DESCENT TANK 2, fuel is reading 60—Okay. DESCENT 2 fuel is reading 68 degrees; oxidizer, 65 degrees.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Copy that, Fred. Thank you. We'd like you to pull the circuit breaker, and we'll probably come to you again in 5 or 6 hours for another check.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. The panel 16 … … ENGINE … OVERRIDE is open.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Aquarius, Houston. Over.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. We're chasing a small glitch that we saw a while ago in the O2 flow rate which is now normal again, but what we'd like you to do is, first of all, to tell us whether, during that canister procedure, you moved O2 DEMAND REG A to any position other than CABIN, and then we'd like you to move it to OFF momentarily and back to CABIN for us.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. To answer your question, Joe, it's no. I checked the CABIN all the time. Qualitatively, when we switched to this configuration, it didn't seem like the frequency or the suit fan noise … decreased … logged down a little bit, but I'll follow your procedure. You want me to take REG A, go to close and back to CABIN; is that correct?

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. We're in close.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Now, I'm back to CABIN.

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Okay. Thank you very much, Fred. I'll get back to you if we see anything.

Unidentified crew member

(Music—The Age of Aquarius)

Joe Kerwin (CAPCOM)

Hey, have you guys got a woman on board?

Fred Haise (LMP)

No way I could handle that.