Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, Vance. First we are going to give you a shot of the sleep station.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. The camera's bounced around a little, but we can see the green computer come in every once in a while.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

While Jack is getting the sleep station rolled up, I thought I would show you one interesting corner. We've got a temporary stowage bag here and that's where all our wastepaper and all that goes while we're—after every meal. It's in the right-hand corner down by our dump system.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. Understand. We're looking at the wastebasket.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

And the age-old question that is always asked us is how do we get rid of liquid waste and that line that you see, I think you can see it now, it goes right outside where we open up the overboard drain dump, and all of our waste products, liquid waste products, go out through that line and get dumped overboard.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. Understand, and we can see somebody's foot, as well.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. Fred is now going down there, and he is going to try to get underneath the sleep station on his side where we have a sleep restraint. And the whole object of that is to … to position the body between the—between the bottom of the spacecraft and—so it doesn't float up between that and the bottom of the couch.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. The sleep restraint of the hammock is coming into view underneath the couch. It's the white object.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

You perhaps can see the zipper of the hammock right now. It's the black lines in that white object.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

These hammocks, by the way, are very comfortable. When we first heard about them in the design of Apollo, we thought they weren't necessary, but they turned out to be very nice devices to sleep in.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

I'm trying now to get down there with Fred to show you how it works. I keep floating up, though, but maybe we can get a little shot here.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. We have somebody upside down in the photograph now. Realizing, of course, in—in space there is no really rightside up or upside down. It still looks that way to us.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. That's—That's Fred now. I'm trying to put him rightside up, for you folks back there in the sleep station. Fred, would you move your hands there so the folks back home can see you?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. That's coming in real clear, Jim. We see Fred in the sleep restaint—restraint.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

As a matter of fact, Vance, I find my—I find Fred down there all the time.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Yes. I can see he appreciates that. Looks fairly comfortable.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Looks like there is a lot of room down there, considering all the boxes on the floor and underneath the couch.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

It's surprising. There still is quite a bit of room down there even with the Hycon camera box down. And now, I'm going to bring the camera back up.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay, Vance. If there is no more that you would like to see right now, we'll terminate our little TV for you today.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. Thank you very much, Jim. Appreciated seeing inside the spacecraft and getting a look at the Moon that you're rapidly approaching.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Roger. This is Odyssey saying goodby.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. At your convenience we have an item to give you which will have to be copied. It's information on how to photograph Comet Bennett at time 32 hours GET. Over.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. Stand by 1 minute.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay, Vance. Go ahead.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. Time 32 hours 00 minutes GET. Instructions at completion of P23, maneuver to following attitude: roll 101.0, pitch 090.0, yaw 000.0. High gain antenna angles will be: pitch minus 23, yaw 93. Use normal PTC procedures to dampen rates. After vehicle's stable, and before spinup, take photographs of Comet Bennett. Use the DAC on the sextant with magazine G. That is, very high-speed black-and-white film, right? That's the dim-light film. Take three photos, one each at 5-, 20-, and 60-seconds' time exposure. Use AUTO optics. NOUN 88 values are R1 plus 34717, R2 minus 08028; R3 plus 35075. Take three photos one each at 5-, 20-, and 60-second time exposure using manual optics. Shaft will be 000.8 degrees, trunnion 12.5 degrees. Comment: Strip off about 50 frames; that is, 2 seconds of—at 24 feet per second before the first frame and after the last frame of the photos. That is, 2 second—2 seconds at 24 frames per second—before the first frame and after the last frame of photos.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Okay. The time is—The event will be at 32:00; and we're to maneuver to the following attitude; roll 101.0, pitch 090.0, yaw all zips. High gain angles will be pitch minus 23, yaw 93. And we're to use normal PTC procedures to damp the rates. And after damping the rates and before spinup, we're to put the DAC on the sextant with the magazine G, very high-speed black and white film. Then, we're to take three photos, one each at 5-, 20-, and 60-seconds' time exposure using audio—AUTO optics. Our NOUN 88 values R1 plus 34717, R2 minus 08028, R3 plus 35075. Thence, three more photos, one each at 5-, 20-, 60-seconds' time exposure using manual optics. Shaft 0.8 degrees, trunnion 12.5 degrees. And we're to take 2—second bursts at 24 frames per second, before and after these pictures.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Your readback is correct, Fred.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Jim, for PTC tonight, request that you disable quads C and D. That's the opposite of last night. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. For PTC tonight, disable quads C and D.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. And advise in approximately an hour, we'll have some read-ups whenever you're ready to take them regarding solo book changes.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. We'll be standing by for it.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Have you all got a chance to look at the data on the SPS yet?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Fred, it looks good, but they haven't had a chance to evaluate everything. They'll probably be finished with looking at strip charts in about 15 minutes, and after that we'll try to get back with you.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

On the P33, just like to verify that you changed the NOUN 88 values for this last star. It looks like they haven't been changed. Over.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's better. Let's read you what we—what we have. We have what they had in the flight plan, and if it's been changed from the flight plan, we don't have it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

We think you're right, Vance. It looks like they used the same set of NOUN 88 for both stars by mistake.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance. That ought to complete the P23s, right?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

We have some results on your—your first star, if you'd like to hear them. The rest of the stars we'll—we'll have to give you in a couple of hours. Over.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay, the first star: the corrected altitude, 15 kilometers plus or minus 4; effective altitude, 12 kilometers plus or minus 7. As far as the substellar point, the value is arc-minutes—2 arc-minutes, and that's very good. And, like I said, we'll get back with you in a couple of hours for the rest.

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Spoken on April 13, 1970, 2:18 a.m. UTC (51 years, 8 months ago). Link to this transcript range is: Tweet

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. We have several items, here. First, is a reminder on the PTC that R1 should be 375—0.375 degrees as last night, to get 0.3-degree rotation rate. The second one —

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. The second one, at 32 hours looking at Bennett's Comet—we want the pictures taken when the spacecraft is as stable as it's going to be before starting PTC. The stability requirement is very high. We weren't sure if you understood that from what we passed up. In addition, the photographs might not show as much as the eye can see of the comet, so if you see anything interesting about the structure of the comet, why, sketching it is in order and is encouraged. Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance. What we'll do is, when we get to attitude, we'll disable the quads and do like we did last night; we'll let GUIDO and you people down there tell us when you think we are stable enough; then we'll do all this work with the DAC on the sextant, first; and then when we get that done, we'll go back and put the sextant eyepiece back on and see what we can observe visually.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. That sounds good. Also, while you are waiting for the vehicle to stabilize, it might be interesting to have the eyepiece on and be looking at it visually. Okay. Next item: your SPS burn had no anomalies whatsoever. It was a very good burn.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Next item: request hydrogen tank 1 HEATER OFF for balancing purposes.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

And Apollo 13, another item: something that we have observed and you might be seeing is a slight TCE fluctuation on fuel cell 3. This fluctuation has been going from about 152 to 160 over a 37-second period. It has been seen on other flights in the past. No one is worried about it, but the usual fluctuation is about 1-1/2 degrees instead of 7 seconds, so I thought you should be aware of it.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance. And one other slight distinction we've noted is the flow of hydrogen versus the oxygen is not exactly matched on fuel cell 3 either.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. We copy. And the last item: we'd like to send you an IRIG update, so at your convenience, request P00 and ACCEPT.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay. We are in P00 and ACCEPT, Vance.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Quad C and D are disabled, Vance.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. Disabled. And down here, we see that your hydrogen and oxygen on the fuel cell are exactly matched, so we suspect it's purely a spacecraft read-out problem.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance, let us know when you're through with the DSKY so we can load NOUN 88?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Roger. We'll let you know, Jack.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Apollo 13, Houston. The computer's yours, again.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay. You're go for the pictures.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance. We tried our AUTO OPTICS and couldn't pick it up there. We're pointing pretty much right into the Sun, and things are pretty well washed out. And I've gone to MANUAL OPTICS and I'm trying to get 0.8, 12.5 on the shaft and trunnion, and I still can't pick it up. So—it's very light in the sextant, so I kind of think maybe we're too near the Sun to see it.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

That's right, Vance. The sextant is all—it's—it's all milky and it—any comet that could be seen through there is just going to be missed in the background.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay, we copy that. We got some discussion. Stand by.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

Okay, Vance, it isn't—we're not looking into the Sun—what we are getting is a large reflection from the Sun behind us off the LM; and it is—it is coming on that quad 1 there, and that quad is reflecting back into the sextant.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Okay, Jack. Understand. Just a question: if you look through the telescope, can you see the comet at all? Over.

Jack Swigert (CMP)

No, I can't, Vance. It's—it's still too light.

Fred Haise (LMP)

Are the flowers blooming yet?

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Gee, I sure haven't seen any.

Vance Brand (CAPCOM)

Hey, we've—we've got quite a discussion down here on your trying to observe the comet, and this reflection is not unexpected. And give us another minute, and we'll be back with you on something on that.

Jim Lovell (CDR)

Okay. I doubt very seriously though, if we take any photographs with high-speed black and white with the light coming into the sextant that you're going to get anything out of it.